GRIDS

Grid 1

(1923-1939)

Pionneers and dust, then 8 cylindres in row domination

The Bentley Boys gain the upper hand over Chenard & Walcker on a 17.262, then 16.340km long and non-tarred track. Passed twice by Lorraine Dietrich, the English keep the supremacy anyway thanks to a capacity increasing, over the years, from 3 to 6.5 litres.

In 1931 on a circuit passing to 13,492 km, the super-charged 2.3 litre Alfa Romeos continue where Bentley left off. Then, Bugatti was next to dominate twice, leaving a single victory for Lagonda and Delahaye.

With 58 cars on the 1935 starting grid a new participation record is broken.

In 1940 motor sports are not a priority. The cannons are rumbling and for 10 years there will be no 24 Hours of Le Mans or any other event.

Grid 4

(1962-1965)

Ferrari at the front and america at the throttle...

In 1962, Ferrari monopolises the podium and becomes the most titled manufacturer in the Sarthe; whereas, after four victories in eight participations, Olivier Gendebien announces his well deserved retirement. This same year, eleven GTs are among the first 13.

Le Mans discovers the turbine in 1963 with a BRM/Rover which will be back in 1965. The victory goes to Ferrari, but Ford and a Lola GT make a notable entrance on Le Mans turf coming back the very next year with three GT40s and 2 Cobra Daytonas. Phil Hill gives Ford a new track record!

Even though Ferrari takes their ninth victory in 1965, it was an American one since the 275 LM was from the N.A.R.T. team (North American Racing Team)!

Grid 2

(1949-1956)

The greens are back!

At recovery time, many makes have disappeared, leaving the track to newcomers. In fact, a brand new manufacturer, Ferrari, wins this first post-war race.

Nevertheless, the '50s are beyond a shadow of doubt the Jaguar years with the help of the C and D Types. Talbot (1950), Mercedes (1952) and Ferrari (1954) come out ahead.

A terrible accident casts a tragic shadow over the 1955 event.

New installations, a wider and shortened track welcome the 1956 edition which, for the first time since 1924, is not held in June.

Grid 5

(1966-1971)

A Ford Victory, but Porsche copes!

No later than 1966, the mid-engine takes the lead. Ford strikes the Cavallino down with a spectacular fight, keeping the whole 1966 podium for itself.

1967 sees the 24 Hours of the Century, with the most breathtaking grid ever. This year, also of all the records, leads the Sporting Authorities to regulate the prototypes' capacity.

The American giant is back with more of the same in 1968, then again in 1969. The GT40 star has earned its stripes…

Then Porsche shifts gear and begins a series of records still to be equalled (24 hours with a 222.3km/h average speed).

Grid 3

(1957-1961)

The red years!

After enslaving the 1000 Miglia, Ferrari impresses Le Mans with seven victories from 1958 onwards, year when 15 hours are fought in the rain and three in an impressive flood…

In 1959, confirming their success at the Nürburgring, Aston Martin manage to slip in with a first and only victory at Le Mans. The British firm does not repeat the following year despite the remarkable achievement of two of its cars being among the 13 survivors out of 55 entries…

In 1961, Ferrari equals Bentley and Jaguar with a fifth victory.

Grid 6

(1972-1981)

Ford confirms, Matra stands out, Porsche takes off...

In 1972, a change of regulations put the 917s out to pasture. The Matra V12s were built and took over with three victories for Henri Pescarolo and then they too were gone…

1975 was the year of the Gulf Mirage (1st & 3rd), which allowed John Wyer to join the very exclusive Endurance Masters Club. This was also the first of Jacky Ickx's consecutive triple wins, which put the Belgian champion equal with compatriot Olivier Gendebien for the record of victories. The record was broken in 2013 by Tom Christensen with nine victories.

In 1978, it was France's turn to stand out on home ground. Renault was ever present, winning hands down. Firstly, the Alpine driven by Frenchmen Didier Pironi and Jean-Pierre Jaussaud held off Porsche from start to finish. Meanwhile, another French driver, Jean-Pierre Jabouille, broke the track record.

The following year the circuit was modified just before the Ferrari BB LMs and BMW M1s turned up and Porsche strung together a collection of triumphs, which is yet to be equalled.

NEW IN 2016: Group C Racing

(1982-1993)

For its 8th edition, Le Mans Classic pushes the boundaries of pleasure... Among the cars that contest the 24 Hours of Le Mans and those lucky enough to be eligible for their retrospective, continues a kind of purgatory, a period that is not represented.

Le Mans Classic 2016 undertakes to remedy this by adding to the six already known grids, a new period: between 1982 and 1993. From the first Rondeaus until the Peugeots 905, without forgetting the Porsches, Jaguars, Mercedes, Toyotas, Nissans and Mazdas. The Group C offers a serious and spectacular curtain raiser to the event on the circuit that welcomed and celebrated them in the '80s. With their modern looks, their windscreens like fighter plane canopies, their doors in elytron and their huge rear wings, the Group Cs hold an irrestible fascination for people of all ages; they are still capable of performances very close to those of the present-day prototypes, as their top speeds exceed 300 km/h!